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Continuing Education

 

As professional agents, we have a duty to stay abreast of industry and regulatory changes, as well as to obtain regular education on critical topics for Florida insurance such as ethics, wind mitigation, and flood insurance.  These are not only required for renewal of your professional license, but they are an important responsibility of all agents in providing superior services to your clients.

There are many ways to keep up with your continuing education requirements and ensure that you have the necessary credits for your renewal.  Among ways that PIA of Florida can help you get your required CE are by checking our Course Calendar, or one of the following:

For more information about what you need to do as a Florida licensee to keep your license current, please review the frequently asked questions below.


Continuing Education Frequently Asked Questions

Note: This information pertains to continuing education (CE) requirements for Florida insurance licenses. The update requirements for optional professional designations are different.

1. How do I find out how many (and what type of) CE credits I need?
2. What are the continuing education requirements for a Florida insurance license?
3. What type of courses must I take?
4. What if I have more than one license?
5. Are there any mandatory CE courses?
6. How do I know whether I need basic, intermediate, or advanced courses?
7. What's my deadline for earning CE credits?
8. I want to attend a CIC institute that runs October 15-18 for my CE credit, but my birthday is October 5th. Will I be penalized for doing my CE late?
9. My compliance date was last month and I just realized that I did not have enough CE hours. What should I do?
10. I took a CIC (or CRM or CISR) class several months ago, but it does not show up on my transcript (or it shows up as a different topic). How can this happen? What can I do?
11. I've lost my transcript and don't know what courses I need to take.
12. I'm considering dropping my life-health license, but keeping my property-casualty license. Will that affect my CE requirements?
13. I'm from another state and I'm thinking of attending a CIC (or CISR or CRM) class in Florida. Can I receive state continuing education credit in my home state? If so, how many hours will I receive?
14. If I attend a CIC, CRM, or CISR class for CE, do I have to pass the exam to earn the CE credits?
15. I can't be away from my office during the day. Are there options for me?
16. Can I attend the same CE course two years in a row and get CE credit?
17. Can you provide some examples of how carryover works?



 1. How do I find out how many (and what type of) CE credits I need?

The easiest way is to view your CE Transcript and your Compliance Evaluation on the Florida Department of Financial Services' (DFS) website.

Go to the My Profile page on the DFS website. When checking your CE, you'll want to logon as an individual, which takes you to your personal data screen. From this screen you can link to your transcript or your compliance evaluation. You should view (and print) both reports.

Your transcript should list all the CE courses you've attended, and you can use it to make sure you've received credit for all your classes, but please allow time for processingundefinedi.e., don't expect a class to show up on your transcript until about a month after you attend it.

Your compliance evaluation gives you your CE bottom line. It will show how many CE hours of each typeundefinedEthics, Life-Health, General Lines (i.e., Property-Casualty)undefinedyou need, and how many hours you've received credit for in each category. This can include hours you earned during the current compliance period and hours that have carried over from the previous period.

Excess hours earned during the current period carry over into the next compliance period and don't show on the current compliance evaluation. Therefore, a course you've taken recently might show up on your transcript, but not on your compliance evaluation, if you've already satisfied your requirement for that type of credit, because those hours are not being used for this compliance period.

No matter how many extra hours of one type you earn, it won't do you any good for your current compliance period if you're short in another area. Make sure you get your 3 hours of Ethics, and enough of whatever other type(s) of CE credits your compliance evaluation says you need.

The bottom line on the compliance evaluation should read either "Not in Compliance” or "Requirement Satisfied.”

Don't be alarmed if the compliance evaluation bottom line is "not in compliance,” until you check which compliance date it applies to. DFS will show you as "not in compliance” from the beginning of your compliance period, until you've satisfied your requirements for that period, but you're not in any trouble until your compliance date passes.

In case you have trouble logging on, or you discover errors in your records, you can call the DFS Division of Licensing at 850-413-3137.

For more details about CE rules and answers to the most common CE questions, continue through the FAQs below.

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 2. What are the continuing education requirements for a Florida insurance license?

In Florida, all licensed insurance agents, customer service reps (CSRs), and claims adjusters must earn continuing education credit hours by the last day of their birth month every other year.

Persons who've held a 2-20, 2-18, 2-15, 2-14, 2-16, 20-44, or 2-40 license for less than six years as of the beginning of their current "compliance period” must earn 24 hours of CE in "basic,” "intermediate,” or "advanced” courses. Those who've held one of these licenses for at least six years by the beginning of their current compliance period must earn 20 hours in "intermediate” or "advanced” courses. In other words, you need 24 hours for each of your first three compliance periods and 20 hours for your fourth and each compliance period thereafter, but once you get to your fourth compliance period you can no longer receive credit for "basic” courses.

Those with any of the corresponding Florida non-resident licenses whose residence licenses are in non-reciprocating states must meet the same requirements. Those in reciprocating states can satisfy their Florida non-resident CE by meeting their resident CE requirements.

Those who have a CPCU or CLU designation or a Bachelor of Science Degree in Risk Management & Insurance (with at least 18 semester hours of upper-level, insurance-related courses) and have been licensed at least 25 years need only 10 hours of CE credit every two years.

Those with a 4-40 or 4-42 license must earn 10 hours of CE, which can be in "basic," "intermediate," or "advanced" courses.

Persons licensed as an Administrative Agent (4-41), Title Agent (4-10), Solicitor (4-20), Motor Vehicle Property Damage and Mechanical Breakdown Agent (2-21), Crop Hail and Multi-Peril Crop Agent (4-30), or Industrial Fire or Burglary Agent (2-33) are also required to complete 10 hours of basic, intermediate, or advanced courses.

As of July 2003, insurance adjusters are required to earn 24 hours of CE credit every two years undefined two hours on ethics, 10 hours on law, and 12 hours on optional topics. Previously, only workers' compensation adjusters were required to earn CE credits.

*IMPORTANT* If your CE Compliance cycles ending 10/31/2014 or later you are required to take the 5-Hour Core Update course. For more information, click here.

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 3. What type of courses must I take?

It depends on the license(s) you hold:
  • General Lines Agents (2-20 license) must earn their CE credit in approved courses on property-casualty (P-C) subjects.
  • Those with a Life & Health license (2-18 or 2-15) must earn their credits in life and/or health insurance (L-H) courses.
  • Personal Lines-only Agents (20-44 license) must earn their credits in approved courses on personal lines topics.
  • Those with a Health-only (2-40) or Life-only (2-16) license, must earn their hours in health or life insurance courses, respectively.
  • Those with the 4-40 (Customer Representative) license must earn their hours in approved property-casualty courses.
  • Those with the 4-42 (Limited CR) license must earn their credits in approved personal auto courses.
  • Persons with only a 2-20 or 4-40 (i.e. no life or health license) can earn up to half of their CE hours in health insurance courses.
    You can find out more about approved course types for each type of license by going to
    https://dice.fldfs.com/public/pb_cereq_srch.asp and searching by license type (i.e., 2-20, 4-40, etc.)

Also see question #5 below regarding mandatory CE courses.

Make sure you're up-to-date with your continuing ed requirements by tracking your credit hours using this handy form.

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 4. What if I have more than one license?

A: Dual-licensed persons (i.e. those with both a P-C and a L-H license) do not have to earn any more credits than someone with one license, but they must earn half of their required CE hours in property-casualty courses and half in life-health courses. Once someone has at least one P-C and one L-H license, extra licenses (e.g., a 1-20 for Surplus Lines) don't affect the number or allocation of the CE credits they must earn.

Note #1 Regarding Multiple Licenses: If you combine a license with a greater CE requirement with one that has a lesser CE requirement, the greater CE requirement will predominate. For example, if you have a 4-40 license and a 2-15 license, you will have to earn 24 hours of basic, intermediate, or advanced CE until you've passed the six-year threshold, then you will have to earn 20 hours of intermediate or advanced CE. Half of your requirement will be in property-casualty and half in life-health. Someone with the 4-40/2-15 combination has the same CE requirements as someone with the 2-20/2-15 combination, even though a 4-40 by itself has a lower CE requirement than a 2-20. This is because of the "rounding up" effect of having one license with a greater CE requirement. This will come into play any time you combine one of the licenses that require 10 hours of CE with one of those that require 24 or 20.

Note #2 Regarding Multiple Licenses: If you earn an additional license, it will not affect your CE requirements for the current compliance period, but it will probably affect the requirements for your next compliance period. For example, if you've had a 4-40 license for several years, and you've recently added a 2-15, you will still need 10 hours of property-casualty CE for the current compliance period, but for your next compliance period you will need 12 hours in property-casualty and 12 in life-health. (You actually have the option of accelerating the change and taking CE courses based on your new license combination immediately. Check with DFS, if interested, at 850-413-3137 x 1101).

Note #3 Regarding Multiple Licenses: This could be a potential CE pitfall: If someone with the 2-20 license obtains an appointment to write health insurance, the DFS automatically adds the 2-40 (health-only) license to their record, and they are then required to earn half of their CE hours in health courses. The DFS does not ordinarily send you any notice if they change your license status, so it's a good idea to check your record on their website periodically, just to make sure it is correct and that you are taking the right type(s) of CE classes.

Helpful CE Tip:
If you have a 2-20 and you acquire a 2-40 license, you may want to add a 2-15 license, which will give you more flexibility in the types of CE courses you can take. Since the 2-15 is broader than the 2-40 (in fact, it is the broadest of all the various life-health licenses), you will be able to earn half of your CE credits in any type of life and/or health classes, rather than specifically in health insurance classes. Of course, the 2-15 also enables you to sell almost any type of life, health or annuity product. Keep in mind that you actually have to obtain an appointment from at least one carrier to maintain the 2-15 or any license.

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5. Are there any mandatory CE courses?

Yes, and they vary depending on which license(s) you hold.

Property-casualty agents (2-20, 20-44) and CSRs (4-40, 4-42), industrial fire (2-33), title (4-10), solicitor (4-20), administrative agent (4-41), and health (2-40) licensees must earn three hours of Ethics CE, and licensed claims adjusters must earn two hours of Ethics CE during each two-year compliance period.

Effective 1/1/09 (so it applies to any compliance date falling after 1/1/09), those who hold any type of life insurance license (2-15, 2-18, 2-14, 2-16) are required to take a three-hour Senior Suitability course. This is essentially an ethics course focusing on the sale of annuities to senior citizens. This requirement replaces the Ethics requirement for life licensees, whether or not they are actively involved in selling life or annuity products.

People with a 2-20, 20-44, or 4-40 license (basically, anybody qualified to place homeowners coverage) must also satisfy a one-hour Premium Discounts & Mitigation Options requirement each compliance period.

Technically, the nonresident equivalents of all of the above-referenced licenses must meet the same requirements, but in most cases they'll do so by satisfying their resident CE requirements, due to reciprocity between Florida and other states.

These mandatory classes are part ofundefined not in addition toundefinedyour required CE hours, so they do not increase your total CE requirement. View your compliance evaluation (see question #1 above) to find out your particular CE requirements and how you stand for your current compliance period.

Unlike Ethics, Senior Suitability and Mitigation, the Flood Insurance course you might have heard about is not required for state CE. It's a one-time course required by NFIP for anyone who wants to be eligible to write flood insurance, whether they're using NFIP or a write-your-own carrier. However, DFS has approved NFIP's free online course
(
http://training.nfipstat.com/portal2/site_map.asp) for CE credit, and CE providers can file flood courses that qualify for both.

In 2007, DFS established a Long-Term Care course requirement for health insurance licensees who sell LTC insurance based on the NAIC's Long-Term Care Model Act. It's also separate from your state CE requirement, but you can find courses that satisfy both. It's up to LTC insurers to confirm that their agents have satisfied this requirement, so you should contact one of your carriers regarding this one.

PIA's Ethics Seminar is approved for three hours of Ethics CE for the Florida agent, customer rep, and adjuster licensees referred to above. Click
here for more information about the classes and to register. and PIA has also partnered with Learn.net and Gold Coast School of Insurance to provide an online ethics class. Click here for more information.

PIA's Senior Suitability and Mitigation courses also satisfy those two requirements, respectively.Cli
ck
here for more information about the classes and to register.

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 6. How do I know whether I need basic, intermediate, or advanced courses?

Don't be confused by the DFS course ratings of "basic," "intermediate" and "advanced."

The important thing to know is that anyone can receive credit for "intermediate" or "advanced" courses, but persons who have a 2-20, 2-15, 2-18, 2-14, 2-16, 20-44, or 2-40 license can no longer receive credit for "basic" courses after their third compliance period.

The six-year threshold (or three-compliance periods) applies to how long you've held whichever of the seven licenses listed above you obtained first. For example, if you've held a 2-20 for five years, and you've recently added the 2-15, you do not start the six years over again. In the next compliance period after your sixth anniversary of holding the 2-20 license (i.e., your fourth compliance period), your CE requirement will decrease to 20 hours, which will have to be in intermediate or advanced courses. Of course, the addition of the 2-15 will require you to earn half of your hours in the life-health area for all future compliance periods.

Persons with either customer rep license (the 4-40 or 4-42) can still receive credit for basic classes, no matter how long they have been licensed. Those with any of the other licenses that only require 10 hours of CE can also still receive CE for classes of any level, regardless of how long they've been licensed.

If someone has one of the licenses requiring 10 hours of CE and one of those that require 24 or 20 hours (see Note #1 Regarding Multiple Licenses above), the 6-year threshold relates to how long they've held the one with the higher CE requirement. For example, if someone has a 4-40 and a 2-40, it does not matter how long they've held the 4-40; the 6-year threshold applies to how long they've held the 2-40.

Keep in mind that the DFS's course ratings are based solely on their review of course outlines and don't necessarily reflect the difficulty level of the classes or any exams that may be involved. Of course, your perception of a class is also influenced by your own experience and relative expertise in different areas. A class that you might find to be advanced could be rated "intermediate," or one that seems basic to you could be rated "advanced."

While they are intended to provide some guidance for prospective students, the DFS's use of these terms pertains primarily to who can receive CE credit for a particular class. You should review promotional materials and speak to the course sponsor and/or former students, if necessary, to get the full picture for any course. For example, both the Certified Insurance Service Representatives (CISR) program and the Certified Insurance Counselor (CIC) program are rated "intermediate," although most participants would probably characterize CIC courses as advanced.

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 7. What's my deadline for earning CE credits?

Each person's "compliance date" is the last day of their birth month every other year.

For those licensed prior to 1991, it would be the last day of their birth month in 1993 (the first year of CE compliance), 1995, 1997, and so on. For those licensed after the beginning of 1991, it would be the last day of their birth month two years after their next birthday after they became licensed (so nobody starts with less than two full years before their first CE deadline) and every other year thereafter. Depending on when you were licensed and when your next birthday was after that, your compliance date could be in even-numbered years or odd-numbered years.

The "compliance period" refers to the two years leading up to and including the compliance date, during which one earns his or her required CE credits.

Example: Hamilton Burger has an April 12th birthday and earned his 2-20 license in November of 2001, so his first compliance date is April 30, 2004. His next birthday after he became licensed was 4/12/02, so his compliance date is established as the last day of the month, two years after that. Hamilton's first compliance period would be from the time he received his license until 4/30/04, about 2.5 years. His second compliance period would run from 5/1/04 - 4/30/06, and all of his future CE compliance dates would be April 30th of each even-numbered year.

Mr. Burger would need 24 hours of CE by 4/30/04, another 24 by 4/30/06, another 24 by 4/30/08 and another 20 hours by 4/30/10. He will have been licensed for six years as of November of 2007, which falls during his third compliance period. He will still need 24 hours for that compliance period, but he will have been licensed for at least six years prior to the beginning of his fourth compliance period (which runs from 5/1/08 to 4/30/10), so he will need only 20 hours of CE for that one. During the first three compliance periods he can take basic, intermediate, or advanced CE courses, but for his 4/30/10 compliance date he can only receive CE credit for intermediate or advanced courses.

Excess hours earned during any two-year compliance period carry over into the next compliance period.

In the above example Hamilton would have until 4/30/04 to earn 24 hours of CE credit. If he attended two CIC institutes during that period, he would earn 42 hours of CE credit, giving him the 24 he needed by 4/30/04, plus 18 that would carry over and go toward his 4/30/06 requirement.

See additional CE Carryover Examples below.

Make sure you're up-to-date with your continuing ed requirements by tracking your credit hours using this handy form.

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 8. I want to attend a CIC institute that runs October 15-18 for my CE credit, but my birthday is October 5th. Will I be penalized for doing my CE late?

No. Remember, your CE "compliance date" is the last day of your birth month every other year. If you have a compliance date this year, it would be October 31st, not your actual birthday, so the October class would be in time.

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 9. My compliance date was last month and I just realized that I did not have enough CE hours. What should I do?

You should earn the CE hours you are lacking as soon as possible. The Department of Financial Services will not suspend or revoke your license for being out of compliance for a short time, but they can fine you. Even if they do not discover it until long after you are back in compliance, they can still go back a levy a fine of $250 for being out of compliance at any point.

If the DFS discovers the discrepancy while you are still out of compliance, they will send you a "settlement stipulation" that gives you 30 days to pay the $250 fine and 120 days to earn the CE hours you lack. If you fail to satisfy these requirements, your company appointments will be suspended and, eventually, you will lose your license.

If your license is ever suspended or revoked, then subsequently reinstated, you will still have to go back and satisfy all outstanding CE requirements, so don't assume that you can start with a clean slate.

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 10. I took a CIC (or CRM or CISR) class several months ago, but it does not show up on my transcript (or it shows up as a different topic). How can this happen? What can I do?

Whenever you attend a CE class, the school sends each student a Certificate of Completion, and they send the Department of Financial Services a Roster of all the students who completed the course. The Certificate of Completion is for your records, and the Roster is what gives you your CE credit--the DFS takes the information and enters it into their system.

Many glitches can occur. If you forgot to turn in your CE request form at the class, you would be left off the Roster. If the Society of CIC/CISR/CRM gets one digit wrong in your license number, the credit will not show up in your record. If the DFS gets an accurate Roster from the Society, they can make a mistake entering it into their system.

Luckily, these are common clerical problems that are easy to resolve. For CIC, CRM, or CISR classes you should call the Society at 800-633-2165. If you forgot to turn in your CE Request at the class, you can still send it to the Society, but you'll have to pay a processing fee. If there was a mistake in the Roster or at DFS's end, the Society can deal with them and get it corrected.

Sometimes it takes a couple of months to get CE records corrected. If your CE compliance date is coming up (or has already passed), don't panic. The key issue is whether you attended the right course(s) in time. Even if it is not corrected in your record before your compliance date, you will not ultimately be penalized if you took appropriate courses and completed them prior to your compliance date.

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 11. I've lost my transcript and don't know what courses I need to take.

If you are uncertain about your personal CE requirements, your CE transcript from the Department of Financial Services will show which licenses you held as of the beginning of the current compliance period, and what your CE requirement is for the current compliance period. Go to https://aalf.fldfs.com/common/com_index.asp to view your transcript. See Question 1 for an explanation of this webpage.

You can also call DFS at 850-413-3137 x 1101 with questions about the licenses you hold, the effect of any new licenses you've added, and your individual CE requirements.

You should always keep your Certificates of Completion (which are normally sent to you by the school putting on the class within a month or two after the class) from all the CE classes you've attended. They can come in handy in case there is ever a discrepancy in your transcript.

By the way, don't confuse the official Certificate of Completion that verifies your CE hours with a certificate of attendance that you may also receive when you attend a class. The certificate of attendance may be suitable for framing, but it may not pertain to whether or not you received CE credit. The Certificate of Completion should have the name of the course, the course number, and the number of CE credits you earned in the lower right-hand corner.

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12. I'm considering dropping my life-health license, but keeping my property-casualty license. Will that affect my CE requirements?

Your CE requirements can also be changed by losing a license. In some cases, losing a license can actually affect the types of classes you can take for the rest of your current compliance period. If you have dropped a license, check with DFS to see how it changes your CE requirements. If you are losing an appointment that will eventually cost you a license (you can only maintain a license for 48 months without an appointment), track the status of that license and the possible changes to your CE requirements.

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 13. I'm from another state and I'm thinking of attending a CIC (or CISR or CRM) class in Florida. Can I receive state continuing education credit in my home state? If so, how many hours will I receive?

The CIC, CRM, and CISR are national programs, so they are approved for CE credit in every state that requires continuing education.

It does not matter where you attend. Whatever number of credits a particular CIC, CRM, or CISR course is approved for in your state, you will receive that number of credits, even if you attend the course in a different state. In other words, the CE credits for any of these classes depend on where the student is licensed, not where the class is held. We have had CIC classes in Florida with students from over 20 states in attendance, each receiving different amounts of CE credit, depending on their home state.

For a regular CIC institute, CRM course, or CISR class, your best bet is to call the Society or whoever sponsors the program in your state to find out how many hours of CE a particular course is worth there. You can also find a listing of CE credits by state for CIC, CISR, and CRM on the Society's website.

For most James K. Ruble Seminars, you should call the Society. For a Graduate Seminar (GS) in Florida, PIA will ordinarily have a list of CE credits for every state, but we usually don't receive it very far out--maybe 1-2 months prior to the class--since each GS is filed individually for CE credit with each state.

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 14. If I attend a CIC, CRM, or CISR class for CE, do I have to pass the exam to earn the CE credits?

No. In fact, you don't even have to take the exam. For classroom programs, CE compliance is based on attendance.

Please note, however, that you cannot receive CE credit for partial attendance. Either you attend the entire course and receive full credit, or you only attend part of the class and receive no credit.

A day of CE may consist of two or more shorter courses, in which case each one could stand alone for CE purposes. In order to receive CE credit for any particular course you would have to attend that whole course, but you would not necessarily have to attend the entire day of courses. Each separate course should have a distinct course number, and course sponsors will generally make this clear in their promotional materials.

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 15. I can't be away from my office during the day. Are there options for me?

There are two options for you: self-study programs and online programs.

For self-study programs you must pass a proctored exam to earn CE credit.

For some online courses, you also have to pass a proctored exam; for others, you don't. The course sponsor can tell you whether a particular class requires an exam for CE.

PIA has partnered with other educational providers that provide a wide range of online educational opportunities. So if you need prelicensing instruction, post-licensing CE, customer service training, or software education, PIA has you covered. Click here for more information. If you have questions, please call our education department at 850-893-8245 for more information.

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 16. Can I attend the same CE course two years in a row and get CE credit?

You cannot receive CE credit for the same course twice within a 36-month period. To be the same course, the class must have the same course number, which is assigned by the Department of Financial Services (DFS) when they approve any new CE course. This is known as the 36-Month No-Repeat Rule.

Course sponsors are required to publish course numbers on all promotions, so students can compare them with past Certificates of Completion to determine whether they are classes that they have previously attended. All licensees should maintain a record of CE courses attended and plan ahead to satisfy their CE requirements on time and avoid repeating a class. If you are not sure whether a class you are considering attending is a repeat, your best bet is to check with the school before you register, and have your CE Transcript (available from DFS at https://aalf.fldfs.com/common/com_index.asp) or your Certificates of Completion handy.

If a course provider re-files a class with revisions, it can receive approval with a new course number, in which case you could attend it again within 36 months and receive CE credit again. Remember, the key from the DFS's perspective is whether or not you have attended a class with the same course number. Having the same title does not necessarily mean it is the same class for CE purposes. When in doubt, contact the course sponsor.

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 17. Can you provide some examples of how carryover works?

The following examples all involve people with various licenses and various amounts of experience earning more than the necessary amount of CE credit to illustrate how the carryover provision works.

We've used CIC and CISR classes in all of these examples, but the same principles apply with any approved CE courses. You just have to know how many hours of CE a particular class provides and whether the hours are in property-casualty or life-health. If you have one of the narrower licenses, you'll need to know whether the course falls within the specific subject area (e.g., personal auto for the 4-42, health insurance for the 2-40). If you've held a 2-20, 2-15, 2-18, 2-40, 2-14, 20-44, or 2-16 license for over six years, you'll need to know whether the class is rated basic, intermediate or advanced.

The CIC Commercial Property (CP), Personal Lines (PL) and Commercial Casualty (CC) institutes provide 20 hours of CE toward a 2-20 or 4-40 license; Life & Health (LH) provides 20 hours toward a life-health license; Agency Management (AM) provides 25 hours, which can go toward either a property-casualty or life-health license, depending on where the student needs the hours. The CISR Personal Auto (PA), Personal Residential (PR), Commercial Property (IP) and Commercial Casualty (IC) classes each provide eight hours of CE credit toward a 2-20 or 4-40 license, and the Agency Operations (AO) course provides seven hours toward a 2-20 or 4-40 plus one hour of ethics. The Personal Auto (PA) CISR class can also go toward the 4-42 license.

CIC institues are rated "advanced" except the Agency Management institute, which is rated "intermediate." CISR classes are rated "intermediate," so anyone can earn CE credit for them.

You can learn more about CIC and CISR by going to our CIC or CISR pages on this website.

To help keep these examples simple we have ignored the fact that someone's CE requirement could change from 24 hours in one compliance period to 20 hours in the next, if they pass the six-year experience threshold.

We are also ignoring the three-hour "ethics" requirements..

Example #1: Roy Hinkley has held a 2-20 license for less than six years (i.e., he needs 24 hours of CE every two years). He attends all five CISR classes in one year, earning 40 hours of CE. This gives Roy the 24 hours he needs for his current compliance period, and he will begin his next compliance period with 16 hours of credit and 9 hours still needed, due to the carryover provision.

Example #2: Zelda Gilroy has a 4-40 license and takes the CIC Personal Lines institute. Zelda earns 20 hours of CE credit, which will satisfy the 10-hour CE requirement for her current compliance period and the 10-hour requirement for her next compliance period.

Example #3: Floyd Lawson has a 2-20 license and is in his fifth CE compliance period (i.e., he needs 20 hours of CE in intermediate or advanced classes). If Floyd attends a CIC institute (other than LH), he will meet his entire CE requirement for the current period. (And if he takes the Agency Management insitute, he'll have five carryover credits into his next compliance period.)

Example #4: Lucille MacGillicuddy has a 2-20 license and a 2-15 license and less than six years of experience (i.e., she needs 12 hours of CE toward each license every two years). If she attends the CIC LH and CP institutes during her first compliance period, Lucy will satisfy her requirements for the current period and start the next period with eight hours toward her 2-20 (the carryover from the CP institute) and eight hours toward her 2-15 (carryover from LH).

Example #5: Don Hollinger has held the 2-20 license and the 2-15 license for over six years, so he needs 10 hours of intermediate or advanced CE credit toward each license every two years. If he attends the CIC PL and AM institutes during his current compliance period, he will earn 20 hours toward his 2-20 (from PL) and 25 hours toward his 2-15 (from AM). This would give Don the 10 hours toward each license that he needs for his current compliance period and the nine he needs toward each license for his next compliance period, plus extra unused hours of each type, since they can't carry over into the third period.

Example #6: Milburn Drysdale has a 2-20 license and less than six years of experience. If he attends all five CIC institutes in one year, he will earn 85 hours of CE credit--20 each for CP, PL, and CC; 25 for AM and none for LH (since it only pertains to life-health licenses). This will satisfy his full 24-hour requirement for the current compliance period and the full 24 hours for his next compliance period. He would still have 37 hours of CE credit above those two requirements, but none of these hours would go directly toward his third compliance period, since the carryover provision only allows CE hours to carry over from one's current compliance period into their next one.

However, since Mr. Drysdale will have already satisfied his entire CE requirement for his next compliance period, any CE hours he might earn during that period (his second of this series) would immediately spill over into the subsequent (his third) compliance period. This is a sort of domino effect that can occur due to the carryover provision.

Example #7: If Fred Ziffel has a 4-40 license and takes all five CISR courses during his current compliance period, he will earn 40 hours of CE credit, which will give him the 10 hours he needs for the current period and the 10 he will need for his next compliance period.

None of the remaining 20 hours would be used but, once again, anything Fred earns during his second compliance period will automatically carry over into his third compliance period, due to the carryover domino effect.

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